Cost to Install Hardwood Flooring

The cost of installing hardwood flooring can vary significantly depending on several factors such as the type of wood, the quality of the wood, the size of the area to be covered, any additional materials needed (e.g., underlayment, adhesives), the complexity of the installation (e.g., subfloor condition, room shape), and labor costs in your area.

On average, you can expect to pay anywhere from $6 to $12 per square foot for materials and installation for standard hardwood flooring. However, high-end hardwoods or intricate installation patterns can increase this cost. Additionally, if you’re hiring a professional installer, their labor costs will be an additional factor.

Cost of Hardwood Flooring

the national average cost of hardwood flooring in the United States, including both materials and labor, typically ranges from $10 to $15 per square foot. This average cost can vary depending on factors such as the type of wood selected, the complexity of the installation, and regional labor rates.

Cost by Size

Hardwood Flooring Cost by Room Size
Room Size (Square Feet)Material Cost per Square FootLabor Cost per Square FootTotal Cost per Square FootTotal Cost for Room Size
100$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20$900 – $2000
200$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20$1800 – $4000
300$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20$2700 – $6000
400$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20$3600 – $8000
500$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20$4500 – $10000

Cost by Species

The cost of hardwood flooring can vary significantly depending on the type of hardwood chosen. Here’s a general breakdown of hardwood flooring costs by hardwood type:

  • Oak: Oak is one of the most common and affordable hardwood flooring options. It typically ranges from $3 to $8 per square foot for materials.
  • Maple: Maple hardwood flooring is known for its durability and attractive grain patterns. It usually costs between $5 to $10 per square foot for materials.
  • Cherry: Cherry hardwood flooring offers a rich, warm tone and tends to be more expensive, ranging from $6 to $12 per square foot for materials.
  • Walnut: Walnut hardwood flooring is prized for its rich color and distinctive grain. It’s on the higher end of the price spectrum, typically costing between $7 to $15 per square foot for materials.
  • Hickory: Hickory hardwood flooring is known for its strength and variation in color. It generally ranges from $5 to $12 per square foot for materials.
  • Mahogany: Mahogany hardwood flooring offers a luxurious appearance and is one of the more expensive options, ranging from $8 to $20 per square foot for materials.
  • Bamboo: While not technically a hardwood, bamboo flooring is often included in hardwood flooring discussions. It’s generally more affordable, ranging from $3 to $10 per square foot for materials.
Hardwood Flooring Cost by Hardwood Type

Hardwood Flooring Cost by Hardwood Species

Hardwood TypeMaterial Cost per Square FootLabor Cost per Square FootFinal Cost per Square Foot
Oak$3 – $8$3 – $8$6 – $16
Maple$5 – $10$3 – $8$8 – $18
Cherry$6 – $12$3 – $8$9 – $20
Walnut$7 – $15$3 – $8$10 – $23
Hickory$5 – $12$3 – $8$8 – $20
Mahogany$8 – $20$3 – $8$11 – $28
Bamboo$3 – $10$3 – $8$6 – $18

Cost by Type

  • Engineered Hardwood: Engineered hardwood consists of multiple layers, with a top layer of hardwood veneer bonded to a plywood or high-density fiberboard (HDF) core. It’s generally more affordable than solid hardwood and ranges from $3 to $10 per square foot for materials.
  • Solid Hardwood: Solid hardwood flooring is made from a single piece of wood throughout its thickness. It’s typically more expensive than engineered hardwood and ranges from $5 to $20 per square foot for materials.
  • Hand-Scraped Hardwood: Hand-scraped hardwood flooring is deliberately distressed to give it a rustic, aged appearance. It tends to be on the higher end of the price spectrum, ranging from $8 to $20 per square foot for materials.
  • Distressed Hardwood: Distressed hardwood flooring undergoes artificial aging processes to create a worn, weathered look. Prices for distressed hardwood flooring can range from $7 to $18 per square foot for materials.
  • Wide Plank Hardwood: Wide plank hardwood flooring features wider and longer planks than traditional hardwood, providing a more expansive look. It’s often more expensive due to the larger pieces and ranges from $8 to $25 per square foot for materials.
  • Reclaimed Hardwood: Reclaimed hardwood flooring is salvaged from old buildings, giving it a unique, historical character. It’s generally more expensive due to its rarity and eco-friendly appeal, ranging from $10 to $30 per square foot for materials.

Factors That Can Influence Hardwood Flooring Cost

Several factors can influence the cost of hardwood flooring installation. Here are some key factors to consider:

  • Type of Hardwood: Different hardwood species vary in price, with some being more affordable (e.g., oak) and others more expensive (e.g., mahogany).
  • Quality and Grade: Higher quality hardwood with fewer imperfections will typically cost more. Grades can vary based on factors such as color consistency, knotting, and straightness of the boards.
  • Finish and Treatment: Pre-finished hardwood flooring tends to be more expensive than unfinished hardwood because it requires additional processing. Special finishes or treatments can also impact the cost.
  • Installation Method: The installation method can affect the cost. For example, nail-down installations might be cheaper than glue-down or floating installations. Additionally, installing hardwood over a concrete subfloor might require additional steps and materials, adding to the cost.
  • Subfloor Preparation: If the subfloor requires repair or leveling before installation, this can increase the overall cost of the project.
  • Room Size and Shape: Larger rooms or irregularly shaped rooms may require more labor and materials, thus increasing the cost.
  • Labor Costs: Labor costs can vary depending on factors such as location, the experience level of the installer, and the complexity of the job.
  • Additional Materials: Additional materials such as underlayment, adhesives, trim pieces, and transition strips can add to the overall cost.
  • Accessibility and Site Conditions: Factors such as the accessibility of the installation site, obstacles that need to be navigated around, and the presence of stairs can affect labor costs.
  • Local Market Rates: Labor and material costs can vary based on the local market conditions, such as supply and demand and regional pricing trends.

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